Module three covers the requirements of employers to ensure the Health and Safety of their employees and non-employees and using the coronavirus epidemic, it looks at how the hierarchy of controls described in the COSHH Regulations and the guidance provided by the UK Government fit within this legal framework when used within Educational establishments by looking at the Hierarchy of Control questionnaire.

Risk Assessment

Within the COSHH Regulations, Regulation 6 requires all employers to carry out a risk assessment.

Four key points of a risk assessment for infection control are represented below by an image with accompanying text underneath. Learn about each point by slowly dragging the selector to the right until you have familiarised yourself with this important topic:

The image below uses a car park as an example for an area to be assessed for risk. Select each of the exclamation icons (!) to examine each area:

A Question for Consideration:

Has your school written a risk assessment for the coronavirus, or updated an existing one to cover pandemics/infectious disease to incorporate the government information on coronavirus?

Have you or the parents of pupils seen it?

Communication is of paramount importance, employees and people connected with the school need to understand what risks have been considered and what is being put in place to protect employees and non-employees (i.e. the pupils)

There is a sample document attached with this training of a risk assessment for a school utilizing the control measures advocated by the Government as part of the guidance issued in 2020 in response to the UK Coronavirus pandemic.

Hierarchy of Control

Now let’s take a look at the hierarchy of control. Select the left and right arrows underneath the image to advance through key areas of information contained on each the slides:

Elimination

The Scenario: Imagine someone touches a door handle in a workplace with an infectious disease. Many people use this door so the handle is continually touched as a means of entry into this particular room and consequently within a 2-4 hour time frame the infectious disease has spread around the work place by other people onto other surfaces that more people now touch. One of the items could be a keyboard on a computer which is used by 6 other people throughout the lessons taught that day.

Now some infectious diseases such as chicken pox are known to have an incubation period of up to 2 weeks before a person becomes unwell and the telltale rash/blisters comes out. Or a person may be a carrier of an infectious disease but be asymptomatic and not show any symptoms or even know they have this disease because they feel fit and well. 

The following graphic contains a number of images and five corresponding steps to eliminate risks of infection. Click the “turn” button at the bottom centre of the image card to reveal the information. Then proceed through each of the remaining steps by selecting the blue arrow at the bottom right of each card:

Engineering Controls or Designing a Workspace

Three environments for engineering controls or designing a workplace are represented below by an image with accompanying text underneath. Learn about each environment by slowly dragging the selector to the right until you have familiarised yourself with this important topic:

Administrative Controls

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

Now let’s take a look at PPE. Select the left and right arrows underneath the image to advance through key areas of information contained on each the slides:

Wherever PPE is deemed a requirement by risk assessment after working through the hierarchy of controls in COSHH, employers need to consider a couple of points:

The image below contains five things to take into consideration when working with PPE. Select each of the question mark icons (?) to work through each consideration:

Face Masks

An effective mask will form a seal where the mask touches the skin to prevent infection getting in or out, depending on what filter strength is used. 

People with certain styles of beard and daily stubble will find that they cannot maintain an effective seal which reduces the effectiveness of the face mask. 

The facial hair pictures below give an indication of which styles would interfere with the seal of a face mask.

Now let’s take a look at guidance for using face masks. Select the left and right arrows underneath the image to advance through key areas of information contained on each the slides:

Government Guidance for Schools & Coronavirus

How does the hierarchy of control fit with the current guidance used for the Coronavirus as a working example of infection control? In this section we will be looking at the current guidance issued by the government on its website regarding coronavirus within the school settings. The following graphic contains eight points of government guidance for schools when managing their environments in light of coronavirus…

The following graphic contains a number of images and corresponding guidance for schools and coronavirus. Click the “turn” button at the bottom centre of the image card to reveal the information. Then proceed through each of the remaining areas of guidance by selecting the blue arrow at the bottom right of each card:

Select the arrows to the left of each additional measure in the accordion below to learn additional guidance and measures which we can avail ourselves of:

Final Knowledge Test

The final knowledge test to follow contains a number of questions to provide you with an opportunity to solidify and retain the information from this course.

To access the final test, click the Infection Control Final Test tab underneath the “Module Content” tab below.

Thereafter, on the next page – click the “Start Test” button to begin.

After answering each question proceed through the remaining questions by selecting the “next” button at the bottom right of each set of answers: